Invitation to Complete the 2015 Global PS Pricing Survey

What You Need to Know About Professional Services Bill Rates
The art and science of services pricing
by Jeanne Urich, Managing Director, SPI Research

Services teams concentrate on utilization and less on rate realization. Focusing on pricing strategy is the key to doing more with less to achieve persistent profitability.  The 2015 Global Professional Service Pricing research helps services organizations understand how they measure up, where they can improve to increase margins and how they can properly position their services in the market.

To participate in the 2015 PS Global Pricing survey, please visit http://www.spiresearch.com/spi-research/2015-ps-pricing-study/
Professional service organizations who complete the survey will receive a free copy of the benchmark.

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The study will provide an analysis of list price and realized bill rates across a broad range of professional services verticals, geographies and job levels around the globe. It will analyze the growing trend toward more offsite consulting delivery and the prevalence of different pricing structures. The report will provide a view of professional services workforce distribution and composition by industry segment through an analysis of organization structures for various service segments including management consulting; IT consulting; software and SaaS; VARs and hardware and networking services.

What the 2011 pricing benchmark revealed

The major takeaway from Service Performance Insight’s 2011 Global Professional Services Pricing study is that success comes from the right combination of pricing policies along with outstanding services delivery quality and workforce efficiency. The two primary profit levers professional services organizations possess are bill rates and workforce productivity, often called billable utilization. PS organizations tend to concentrate more on productivity, often ignoring price improvements. Efforts to enhance price realization can produce both instantaneous and sustainable profit improvements.

The cause and effect of higher bill rates

Price realization based on realized bill rates in combination with billable utilization is a leading indicator of the overall quality and differentiation of the PS organization. Professional services organizations with the highest bill rates and best price realization tend to reinvest profit into their employees, which in turn, leads to a continuing improvement cycle.

Highly skilled, well-trained, motivated and loyal consultants undoubtedly produce the best client results. Satisfied clients provide referrals and buy additional services resulting in improved sales effectiveness.

Based on nine years of benchmark data, one of the consistent themes is the correlation between high bill rates and employee investment resulting in superior project delivery metrics and overall financial profitability. Bill rates, however, only tell a part of the story.

The market, the types of services provided and the reputation of the firm primarily govern rates. Management consulting senior partner daily rates are as high as $8,000 while Indian software development resources are priced as low as $25 per hour.

The top strategic management consultancies don‘t publish their rates, nor do they make them visible to their clients. These rates are justified based on the significant “bet your business” types of projects these firms deliver. High rates indicate the strategic business value top firms provide.

At the other end of the spectrum, the lowest bill rates are shown in commoditized hardware installation and repair, where providers mainly focus on implementation. Staff augmentation garners low rates because the client assumes almost all of the responsibility for successful business outcomes. Clients are buying a body with a specific skillset as opposed to a project based on a measurable business results.

Differentiation, specialization and market growth drive rates upward while commoditization and shrinking market demand drive rates down. The law of supply and demand is clearly evident in the pricing report because software as a service (cloud) services now command a 20 to 30 percent premium over traditional enterprise software bill rates.

Why is pricing important?

In a labor-based business like professional services, profit comes from the right balance of revenue and costs. PSOs have a very high fixed labor cost so the two primary profitability levers are either lowering cost (employee and subcontractor sourcing strategies, limiting benefits and overhead, using virtual business models and restricting discretionary spending on IT, travel, training and recruiting) or increasing revenue (higher bill rates, higher revenue per person, higher billable utilization and a higher proportion of billable headcount).

Throughout the recession, PSOs focused intently on the cost side of the equation. Now with economic improvement, they are concentrating on growing revenue through a combination of rate, market expansion and productivity enhancements.

Professional Service Pricing Strategies

Pricing strategies vary dramatically by market and geography. European PSOs prefer daily rates which may or may not include travel expenses. The percentage of time and materials priced contracts across all markets and geographies was reported to be almost 60 percent.

Every year a greater proportion of contracts across all verticals and geographies are fixed price reflecting client interest in shifting more risk and accountability to services providers. Table 1 shows a comparison of pricing strategies across PS vertical markets. It reveals IT consultancies and PSOs within software companies depend heavily on time and materials based pricing strategies.

Hardware and networking providers and SaaS PSOs have shifted the majority of their work to services packages and fixed price contracts while management consultancies favor time and materials based contracts, but may include performance guarantees.
Table 1. Pricing Structure by Organization Type
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Future expectations for bill rates
All signs point to an unstable global economy for some time to come. Bill rates are not uniform around the world. Across the board, global consulting bill rates have been relatively stagnant while target utilization rates have continued to climb. The key question is how can the professional service industry sustain a business model where employees and subcontractors must be billable 75 percent or more of their time?
Will the pressure to work excruciating hours subside with the shift to a global and virtual economy? As the reality of increased consulting demand outstrips available supply, expect to see average billable hours to continue to increase, perhaps to a breaking point. Rates for the hardest to find resources are climbing.

Around the world, a significant price disparity exists for the same job skills within the same industry segments. If an organization can establish its brand and reputation as the highest-quality supplier in its market space, it can command the best rates.

Conversely, for services providers stuck in a commoditizing rut, the only viable strategy is to head for higher ground by expanding into a more lucrative market. For example, low-end enterprise resource planning providers will find new opportunities and premium rates if they add vertical expertise or take on new cloud technologies and services. Research indicates the unlimited possibilities for establishing new, exciting and profitable service lines will require significant leadership, vision and courage.

Bottom line, the consulting industry is thriving. Expect not only a heightened focus on bill rates, but also significant labor shortages ahead. Top performing firms will focus on both recruiting and retaining top talent while making sure they take advantage of premium pricing to fund these investments.

Sales and Services Alignment

How to eliminate gulfs and fix dysfunctions
by Carey Bettencourt, Jeanne Urich and Dave Hofferberth, Service Performance Insight

In a highly competitive environment, a company must successfully differentiate itself and effectively orchestrate the sales cycle. Unfortunately, many times schisms between the sales and services delivery organizations surface during the sales process. This results in deal closure delays or, worse yet, losing the deal.

qualityThe winning formula for sales and services delivery collaboration is based on a combination of aligned business processes and measurements reinforced by a supporting technology platform like customer relationship management and professional services automation. This article examines the root causes underlying dysfunctional sales and services delivery relationships and identifies common business process breakdowns, as well as the path to alignment.

Background

Most organizations struggle with a lack of cooperation between the sales and services delivery functions. Based on six years of professional services industry benchmarking with responses from more than 1,500 professional services organizations, we have discovered that few professional services organizations are satisfied with the relationship between sales and services delivery. According to the 2013 PS Maturity Model Benchmark report, sales effectiveness received a poor score of 6.4 out of 10; marketing effectiveness was worse at 5.2 out of 10.

A lack of alignment and trust between sales and services delivery leads to lost opportunities, miss-set client expectations, underscoped projects and poor resource utilization. Best-in-class organizations have found a way to bridge the sales and services divide to reap rewards in terms of larger pipelines, higher win-to-bid ratios, higher levels of consultant utilization and more satisfied clients.

The complexities of identifying professional services opportunities and developing them into successful client engagements demand a more structured approach to business development and a seamless information flow between sales and services delivery. This ensures opportunities are properly prioritized, scoped and staffed.

While the consulting market currently experiences healthy growth, both up and down markets accentuate breakdowns between sales and services. When fewer deals are available and sales cycles are longer, heightened pressure and a sense of urgency to close deals may exacerbate an already dysfunctional sales and services relationship. On the other hand, when opportunities are plentiful, resource imbalances and heightened risk aversion may also strain sales and services liaisons.

Sources of sales and services dysfunction

Gulfs between sales and services typically emerge in the choppy waters between functions where the overly optimistic sales tide meets the risk-averse services shore. Who, and which function is in charge of piloting client opportunities through these brackish seas?

Typical sales and services breakdowns occur in the following areas:

  • Proposals. PSOs often demonstrate a lack of clarity around which opportunities to pursue, how to create a winning proposal or who is ultimately in charge. Ambiguity can lead to procrastination; excessive bid costs; acceptance of egregious terms; and not enough time, tools or resources to bring all the pieces together into a compelling value-based proposal.
  • Pricing and scoping. In many cases, it’s unclear who has authority for discounting and contract terms. Poorly defined or unknown requirements, weak estimating tools, vague discounting limits, and inadequate or no pricing or contractual reviews contribute to mediocre financial results and unacceptable levels of risk.
  • Forecasting and staffing. Many PSOs are deficient in what it takes to move a suspect to a high-probability deal or how the sales forecast is translated into the resource plan. A lack of alignment and trust are exacerbated by noncongruent sales booking and services margin goals. Unreliable sales forecasts lead to disconnected sales and resource planning processes and insufficient functional interlock regarding opportunities and required staffing. The outcome is the absence of integration between sales, staffing and recruiting, resulting in not enough or too much services delivery capacity.
  • Services execution. Inconsistent communication between services delivery and sales regarding project status often occurs. No project dashboards, improper planning, and poor execution of scope changes and change orders lead to project overruns, nasty surprises and unhappy clients.

Business process requirements for sales and services alignment

A lack of agreement around key business processes that cross organizational or functional boundaries is at the core of dysfunctional sales and services delivery relationships. Issues are typically the result of differing views of the processes, unknown or misused levels of authority, and ambiguity around decision-making and measurements.

The foundation for all high-performing organizations comes from clear business process understanding and ownership tied to congruent goals and measurements. Table 1 illustrates how a simple method of assigning ownership and measurement of cross-functional business processes provides clarity and enhances performance.

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The impact of sales and services alignment

Effective sales and services delivery teamwork is at the heart of performance in the services industry. The integration of sales and services delivery business processes and systems is paramount to success.

In our 2013 PS Maturity Model Benchmark report, the “best of the best” embrace sales and services delivery alignment, and their results as shown in Table 2 speak for themselves.

t2

CRM and PSA integration drive performance

As Table 2 shows, integrated customer relationship management and professional services automation applications are key to breaking down the barriers between sales and services by providing accurate client and project information throughout the client life cycle. Running a knowledge and skill-intensive business like professional services with disconnected applications, spreadsheets and email is no longer a competitive option. Efficient execution across core business processes demands visibility, transparency and control.

Ideally, information flow mirrors and illuminates core business processes, beginning with prospecting and extending through the client life cycle. Time, cost, engagement progress and quality are critical elements that must be tracked throughout. Integrated applications provide visibility, alerts and work flow to ensure following of proper steps, securing of approvals and flagging of variances.

Executives and other involved personnel should be able to track information from the initial bid through project completion and invoicing. With this information, both management and consultants can monitor deals to ensure high levels of client satisfaction with acceptable revenue and profit margins.

The integration of PSA and CRM helps the sales organization to better understand the entire client relationship and discover opportunities to sell additional products and services. Sales and services cooperate to decide whether work should be bid, and at what price to win the opportunity and meet margin requirements. Both organizations can share information to be included in the proposal with the appropriate staffing plan and financial forecast as backup.

Accurate information enables the services delivery team to proactively plan and staff projects with the right resources while supporting the sales team in closing opportunities. The executive team is armed with real-time visibility into revenue and costs to support effective decision-making.

The 2013 PS Maturity Model Benchmark report demonstrates the power of CRM and PSA integration as an important foundation for improving sales and services delivery alignment. The benefits of sales and services delivery collaboration speak volumes.

Money Ball

How professional service bill rates drive profit
by David Hofferberth and Jeanne Urich, SPI Research

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In 2002, the Oakland A’s, the nation’s lowest-paid Major League Baseball team, cracked an 11-game losing streak, coming back to win 20 games in a row. The team set a new American League record and won the American League West Division championship.

The premise of Money Ball — both the book and movie — is about changing the rules of the game by using statistics instead of intuition to hire and ramp undervalued baseball players. The idea is to wring the maximum number of wins out of every player dollar by identifying value based more on “on base percentage” than subjective characteristics like good looks and drive.

That sounds a lot like the PS Maturity™ Model. The original and continuing foundation of Service Performance Insight’s PS Maturity™ Model is that overall performance is not based on home runs. Instead, it’s a combination of singles and doubles in the form of winning business processes, systems and people. The PS Maturity™ Model measures, analyzes and correlates 180 Key Performance metrics to create a Maturity scorecard for each participating organization. Like baseball player statistics, the Maturity scorecard helps diagnose strengths and weaknesses and what it takes to advance to the next level of maturity.

The Maturity scorecard diagnoses maturity based on five dimensions, called Service Performance Pillars:

  • Leadership.
  • Client relationships.
  • Human capital alignment.
  • Service execution.
  • Finance and operations.

Grounded on input and participation from more than 800 PS organizations in the past five years, the PS Maturity Model™ itself has continued to evolve and improve. Business practices and measurements considered best in class in 2007 when SPI first created the model appear lackluster and outdated today.

With this as a backdrop, Service Performance Insight (SPI) has published the “2011 Professional Services Global Pricing Report” with input from 200 PS organizations representing a global consulting workforce of nearly 12,000 consultants.

The major takeaway from the largest technology professional services (PS) pricing study is that success comes from the right combination of pricing policies combined with outstanding service delivery quality and workforce efficiency. The two primary profit levers professional service organizations possess are bill rates and workforce productivity, frequently called billable utilization. PS organizations tend to concentrate more on productivity, often ignoring price improvements, which can produce instantaneous and sustainable profitability.

The cause and effect of higher bill rates

Price realization based on realized bill rates in combination with billable utilization is a leading indicator of the overall quality and differentiation of the professional services organization. Professional services organizations (PSOs) with the highest bill rates and price realization tend to reinvest profit into their employees, which in turn leads to a continuing improvement cycle.

Highly skilled, well-trained, motivated and loyal consultants undoubtedly produce the best client results. Because of this, satisfied clients provide referrals and buy additional services, resulting in improved sales effectiveness.

One of the consistent themes in five years of benchmarking is the correlation between high bill rates and employee investment resulting in superior project delivery metrics and overall financial profit. Yet, bill rates only tell a part of the story. The market, the types of services provided and the reputation of the firm primarily govern rates. SPI Research has seen management consulting senior partner daily rates as high as $8,000, while Indian software development resources cost as little as $25 per hour.

The top strategic management consultancies don’t publish their rates, nor are they visible to their clients. These rates are justified based on the significant “bet your business” types of projects these firms deliver. High rates indicate the strategic business value top firms provide.

At the other end of the spectrum, the lowest bill rates are shown in the hardware and networking sector, where providers mainly focus on implementation. They haven’t yet moved to more strategic consulting services. Staff augmentation garners low rates because the client assumes almost all of the responsibility for successful business outcomes. Clients are buying a “body” with a specific skill set as opposed to a project based on a defined business outcome.

Differentiation, specialization and market growth drive rates upward while commoditization and shrinking market demand drive rates down. The law of supply and demand is evident in the pricing report by the fact that software-as-a-service (cloud) services now command a 20 to 30 percent premium over traditional enterprise software bill rates.

Bill rate sensitivity chart

As part of this pricing study, SPI created Figure 1 to demonstrate the important role bill rates play in generating profit. This figure depicts a 100-billable-person PSO and shows the effect bill rates have on profit (the left axis in $millions). SPI has normalized consultant cost to reflect a 100-person workforce with an average loaded cost per person of $135,000. ($100K base salary, $20K in fringe benefits, $10K bonus and $5K in non-billable discretionary spending).

The figure allows an organization to analyze the effect of bill rates on profit. This organization will be profitable at an average bill rate exceeding $250 per hour with average utilization of only 30 percent (600 hours per year per person). Conversely, with average rates below $175 per hour, average utilization must be 60 percent (1,200 hours per year per person) or higher to achieve a minimal amount of profit.

Figure 1. 100-Billable-Employee PSO — Bill Rate / Utilization / Profitability Sensitivity

BillSensitivity
Source: Service Performance Insight, October 2011.

Why is pricing important?

In a labor-based business like professional services, profit comes from the right balance of revenue and costs. PSOs have a very high fixed labor cost, so the two primary profitability levers are either lowering cost (sourcing strategies; limiting benefits and overhead; using virtual business models; restricting discretionary spending on IT, travel, training and recruiting) or increasing revenue (higher bill rates, higher revenue per person and higher billable utilization).

For three recessionary years, most PSOs have focused intently on the cost side of the equation and run very lean. Now with a glimmer of economic improvement, it is time to concentrate on growing revenue through a combination of rate, market expansion and productivity enhancements.

Published versus realized rates

This study compares PSOs’ published bill rates versus realized bill rates — in other words, the actual hourly bill rate firms receive. In general, realized rates are approximately 80 to 90 percent of published list rates. The difference between published and realized rates reflects both discounts and written-off consulting hours.

The report looks at four primary job categories:

  • Management.
  • Project management.
  • Business consulting.
  • Technical consulting.

And it assigns three corresponding experience levels per job family. Of the 12 job titles SPI Research analyzes in this report, technical consultants achieved the highest percentage of realized rates, with a realized rate of 90 percent of the published rate.

Interestingly, SPI Research found the greatest disparity between published and realized rates associated with the most senior-level positions in each job category. The most senior resources in any job category commanded the highest list rates but reported the highest levels of discounting.

Key questions around lower price realization are Is the high level of discounting due to an excessively high target bill rate? Is there more room for discounting because of a higher list rate? Is it hard to establish incremental value for more senior resources? SPI Research suspects the answer is a combination of these factors.

Pricing Strategies

Pricing strategies vary dramatically by market and geography. European PSOs prefer daily rates, which may or may not include travel expense. The percentage of time-and-materials-priced contracts across all markets and geographies was reported to be 58.8 percent. Each year a greater proportion of contracts across all verticals and geographies are fixed-price, reflecting client interest in shifting more risk and accountability to service providers. A comparison of pricing strategies across PS vertical markets reveals IT consultancies and PSOs within software companies depend heavily on time-and-materials-based pricing strategies.

Hardware and networking providers and SaaS PSOs have shifted the majority of their work to service packages and fixed-price contracts, while management consultancies favor time-and-materials-based contracts but may include performance guarantees.

Table 1. Pricing Structure by Organization Type in Percentages

2010FeeStructure
Source: Service Performance Insight, October 2011.

Consultant resource mix is changing

Worldwide, the traditional consulting pyramid is alive and well, with the percentage of resources in management (7 percent), project management (19 percent), business consulting (16 percent) and technical resources (58 percent) still reflecting that project managers and technical resources perform the bulk of the work and generate the majority of profit.

The shape of the pyramid varies dramatically by vertical market and geography, with management consultancies supporting a top-heavy partnership structure while traditional outsourcing destinations like India rely on a high constituency of technical resources.

Across the technology consulting industry, SPI Research has seen a significant change in employee job skill distribution. In the past, 70 to 90 percent of resources were technical consultants. Now 30 to 50 percent of consultants are focused on project management and business consulting, reflecting the underlying technology shift to easy-to-use-and-configure products. Today’s consultants spend more time analyzing and improving their clients’ business problems and processes than doing software development or writing code.

With more than 53 percent of the work delivered off-site, more consultants are working virtually. Even the smallest consultancies have started taking advantage of offshore and near-shore skilled labor to reduce cost and to fill hard-to-find competencies.

Signs point to an unstable global economy for some time to come. Bill rates aren’t uniform around the world. Across the board, global consulting bill rates are rising slightly while target utilization rates have plummeted.

In general, this is a good trend for service providers and consultants because it signifies a greater demand for their most valuable services and people, while the pressure to work excruciating hours may be subsiding. However, as the reality of increased consulting demand outstrips available supply, expect to see average billable hours increase beyond the low targets set.

Around the world, a significant price disparity exists for the same job categories within the same industry segments. If an organization can establish its brand and reputation as the highest-quality supplier in its market space, it can command the best rates.

Conversely, for service providers stuck in a commoditizing rut, the only viable strategy is to head for higher ground by expanding into a more lucrative market. For example, low-end enterprise resource planning providers will find new opportunities and premium rates if they add vertical expertise or take on new cloud technologies and services. SPI’s research indicates the unlimited possibilities for establishing new, exciting and profitable service lines will require significant leadership, vision and courage.

The use of a global workforce isn’t limited to the largest service providers, as small boutique consultancies have begun taking advantage of labor arbitrage. Firms that offer management consulting (strategy, IT, etc.) along with implementation (new applications, business process re-engineering, etc.) are in greater demand and can charge higher rates.

The bottom line is that the consulting industry thrives. Expect not only increased bill rates, but also significant labor shortages ahead. Top-performing firms will focus on both recruiting and retaining top talent while making sure they take advantage of rate increases to fund these investments.

Money Ball puts forth the notion that undervalued teams and players can compete and win by focusing on “getting on base” while leaving richer teams to “swing for the fences.” SPI’s research proves the winning formula is to focus on productivity and quality combined with high-value pricing strategies.

Measuring the right statistics to find untapped gold can be translated into improved productivity and higher rates wins in the end. Both Money Ball and the PS Maturity™ Model prove statistics don’t lie. Using them intelligently to field the best possible team at the lowest possible cost puts not only runs on the scoreboard, but also profit into shareholders’ wallets.

 

Let’s Talk About Bill Rates

The current state of professional services pricing
by David Hofferberth and Jeanne Urich, SPI Research

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If professional services bill rates are rising, the economy must be improving, right? Service Performance Insight (SPI) has drawn this conclusion in the first two weeks of surveying more than 50 global professional service organizations for our third annual consulting bill-rate study.

Based on history, SPI expects more than 200 firms to participate. Please visit www.spiresearch.com in September to purchase a copy of the report. Early analysis shows significant improvement in realized hourly bill rates from the 2010 survey.

Why are bill rates important?

Professional services organization (PSO) executives continue to ask about bill rates. They need this information to understand how their organization is positioned from a pricing perspective relative to the market, and to make decisions on how much more or less they should charge, depending on their own and their clients’ perception of how they are viewed in the market. They need bill-rate information to push back on their sales and finance counterparts when asked for price concessions or professional services margin improvement.

Pricing information also provides insight into the health of the overall service market and a gauge for expansion or contraction. And finally, pricing is one of the most visible and controllable levers service organizations have when seeking to improve profitability.

In the past three years, as the market suffered from global economic doldrums, companies experienced significant pressure on bill rates, causing many firms to discount heavily and make pricing concessions to win business. The economy appears to be growing again, although in the early stages, and SPI Research expects bill rates will also rise.

In fact, the greatest challenge reported from recent client phone interviews is growth. After two years of layoffs, headcount cuts and salary freezes, many firms have switched the hiring spigot back on but find few qualified resources available to fill new positions. Firms are reinvigorating their recruiting pipelines and reinvesting in new-hire training and ramping programs.

Increasingly, firms are expanding their recruiting horizons to include recent college graduates, home-based consultants, subcontractors, and offshore and near-shore resources. The war for talent is driving increased resource management and pricing complexity, which means firms must constantly re-evaluate their pricing and staffing strategies.

Is the market recovering?

SPI Research is receiving positive feedback from around the world. PSOs, especially those in IT consulting and management consulting, have experienced significant growth over the past 12 months.

While executives interviewed by SPI Research remain cautiously optimistic, most feel the difficult times are behind them, and they predict a period of sustainable growth lies ahead.

Key bill-rate findings in the North American market

Initial research shows bill rates rising across the board. In North America, current rates are approximately 5 to 15 percent higher than a year ago. Interviews with several survey respondents have shown their greatest concern is hiring well-qualified consultants, not finding more work. This scenario allows them to adjust rates upward as the demand for their services starts to outstrip supply.

The only area where SPI Research found year-over-year bill-rate erosion is in that of managers and executives. Apparently, client organizations are less apt to pay high rates for executives than in the past. However, for those managers primarily in a billable client-facing role, rates have risen somewhat.

Interestingly, few managers and executives are no longer nonbillable. On average, today’s managers not only run the business, but also bill about one-third of their time. The recession caused both big and small PSOs to re-evaluate their nonbillable headcount and shift many managerial roles to at least partial billability. SPI expects this trend to quickly reverse as management focus shifts from cost-cutting to expansion.

Published vs. realized rates

This study compares PSOs’ published bill rates versus realized bill rates. In other words, the actual hourly bill rate firms receive. In general, realized rates are approximately 80 to 90 percent of published list rates. This difference between published and realized rates reflects both discounts and written-off consulting hours.

The report looks at four primary job categories (business consulting, management, project management and technical consulting), with three corresponding experience levels per job family. For the 12 titles SPI Research analyzes in this survey, executives achieved the highest percentage of realized rates, closely followed by technical consultants, with each having a realized rate of more than 90 percent of the published rate. SPI Research found the greatest disparity between published and realized rates for business consultants with a published rate of $200 per hour but with an average realized rate slightly above $160 per hour.

The survey also shows independent PSOs, such as those in IT and management consulting, have both higher published rates and higher realized rates than their peers within embedded service organizations (i.e., services divisions of hardware and software organizations).

Embedded service organizations are being forced to discount more, as well as write-off more of their billable hours for presales and client concessions. The survey results to date show embedded service organizations achieved a realized rate of 81 percent of their published rate, whereas independents averaged 90 percent of their published rate.

More off-site work

For the past several years, SPI Research has seen a noticeable increase in off-site consulting delivery. For instance, the survey results thus far show business consultants average slightly more than 50 percent of billable work on-site, while project managers average slightly less than 50 percent on-site.

Technical consultants spend the most time on-site (more than 60 percent), while managers spend the least (33 percent). The trend toward more off-site service delivery is important because it offers a host of benefits for both service providers and their clients. By definition, on-site work requires significant nonbillable wasted travel time.

Excessive travel has consistently been the primary reason for consulting employee dissatisfaction and burnout. Combined with the trend toward greater specialization, the probability that the most qualified consultants are conveniently located near their clients is low.

SPI research also shows on-site consultants are less productive than off-site consultants, due to interruptions and not being able to multitask. On-site presence is still required to establish rapport, develop client requirements and model client business processes. However, if consultants clearly understand client requirements, expectations and deliverables, much of the actual work can be performed off-site.

Finally, both service providers and clients benefit from taking advantage of the best available resources, regardless of location. This trend means more consultants work from home, which translates to lower facility costs. Furthermore, more service providers are taking advantage of subcontractors and offshore resources, which results in a positive margin impact from labor arbitrage.

Targeted utilization rates much lower than expected

One of the biggest surprises — so far — in the survey is that the 50 organizations surveyed are targeting fewer than 1,400 billable hours annually per role, which equates to less than a 70 percent utilization rate (on the basis of a 2,000-hour work year). On average, executives and other management have billability targets of less than 50 percent, but with the exception of senior business consultants — who average slightly more than 1,400 hours annually — every other consultant type is targeted to bill fewer than 1,400 hours annually.

Also shocking is the small difference between billing targets for juniors compared to the most senior resources. In past surveys, junior technical resources typically had higher billability targets while senior project managers and solution architects had lower targets. As more survey responses come in, it will be interesting to see if billability targets increase and a greater gap appears between junior and senior resources.

Consultant resource mix is changing

Another big revelation is that the percentage of resources in business consulting roles (31 percent) is equal to the percentage of technical resources (31 percent). Across the technology consulting industry, this represents a sizable change and reflects the underlying technology shift to easy-to-use-and-configure products. Resources can spend more time analyzing and improving their clients’ business problems and processes as opposed to writing code.

Also unexpected is that the remaining job categories of management (19 percent) and project management (21 percent) are almost equal. Before beginning this survey, SPI expected that technical resources would represent a significant majority, followed by business consultants and project managers, while management would represent less than 10 percent of the workforce. To date, the staff associated with all other roles (69 percent) outnumbers technical resource staff (31 percent).

The near future expectations for bill rates and opportunities

Signs point to an improving economy, but bill rates are certainly not uniform around the world. Across the board, global consulting bill rates are on the rise, while target utilization rates appear to have plummeted.

In general, this is a good trend for service providers and consultants because it signifies a greater demand for their most valuable services and people, while the pressure to work excruciating hours may be subsiding. However, as the reality of increased consulting demand outstrips available supply, expect to see average billable hours to increase far beyond the low targets that appear to have been set.

Around the world, there is a significant price disparity for the same job categories within the same industry segments. Service providers should price for what the market will bear. If an organization can establish its brand and reputation as the highest-quality supplier in its market space, it will be able to command the best prices.

Conversely, for service providers stuck in a commoditizing space, the only viable strategy is to head for higher ground by expanding into a more lucrative market. For example, low-end enterprise resource planning providers will find new opportunities and premium rates if they add vertical expertise or take on new cloud services. SPI’s research indicates the unlimited possibilities for establishing new, exciting and profitable service lines will require significant leadership, vision and courage.

Currently, most industries are planning for expansion, and therefore, consultants who can help them grow will be in demand. The use of a global workforce is not constrained to the largest service providers as small boutique consultancies start to take advantage of labor arbitrage. Firms that offer management consulting (strategy, IT, etc.) along with implementation (new applications, business process re-engineering, etc.) are in greater demand and can charge higher rates.

The bottom line is that the consulting industry is thriving and improving every day. Expect not only increased bill rates, but also significant labor shortages ahead. Best-performing firms will focus on both recruiting and retaining top talent while making sure they have ample increases in bill rates to make these investments.

Bill Rates Are Increasing!

2010 Professional Services Maturity Model Benchmark survey early results
by Jeanne Urich and Dave Hofferberth, SPI Research

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The technology professional services industry is recovering from the worst recession of a lifetime. The good news: With recovery, bill rates are returning to previous levels and aggressive discounting has begun to subside.

The early results from the 2010 Professional Services (PS) Maturity Benchmark survey show significant growth in year-over-year technology professional services revenue and achievement of 2010 PS revenue targets. The significant improvement in revenue achievement is the direct result of increasing bill rates accompanied by a lower level of discounting.

Across the board, average bill rates for most technology consulting job titles have improved moderately to significantly. Bill rates for almost all job categories have returned to pre-recession 2007-2008 levels after two years of decline.

The average business consultant bill rate showed the greatest percentage improvement (110 percent), from $171 to $188 per hour. Only the average senior manager/partner bill rate category is showing a year-over-year bill-rate decline — from $232 to $222 per hour.

Establishing a rate sheet

Competitive pressures in the technology professional services industry have created “mini-markets” for technology skills. The most prolific technologies — Oracle, SAP and Microsoft — have well-established bill rates for specific skill sets. Most technology services providers that focus on these platforms understand the unwritten “market rate” for consultants, but huge variances in price ranges occur, depending on services provider reputation, specialization, industry knowledge and skill sets.

Bill rates in emerging technology areas are far less predictable, but a best practice for all services providers is to establish a rate sheet based on skill level with uplifts for risk, complexity, geography or terms. Base your rates on analysis of market rates combined with consultant cost.

In the technology professional services industry, the “rule of thumb” is to establish rates at a minimum of two times (2X) the fully loaded average cost of all the consultants in that job category. In many other professional services specialties such as legal or accounting, the bill rate rule of thumb is four times (4X) the average base salary for all specialists in that job category.

For project managers, here’s a simple example for establishing a published bill rate:

  • $100K average annual salary for all the project managers at a particular skill level.
    • Add $20K for 20 percent average uplift for benefits; selling, general and administrative costs, and overhead plus IT and facility cost allocations.
    • Add $10K for 10 percent average annual bonus.
    • $130K average loaded cost.
    • $260K required average revenue per project manager (2X loaded cost).
    • 1,400 billable hours per year (70 percent billable utilization).
    • $186 per hour required average bill rate.
    • $205 per hour published bill rate accommodates an average 10 percent discount.

Average bill rates flat for the past five years

The interesting news is that domestic rates in the U.S. ($200 per hour on average) have remained relatively constant since 2000 because of increased global labor arbitrage and pressure from low-cost offshore providers. Another factor influencing the billable labor rate is enhanced product quality and ease of use, enabling technology professional service providers to use lower-skilled and less expensive resources.

Premium rates still exist (more than $250 per hour) for highly skilled management consultants and technology gurus — particularly in the areas of business process design, business intelligence, security, service-oriented architecture and enterprise integration.

Flat bill rates have placed pressure on professional services organizations to increase utilization and reduce overhead and benefit costs to produce margin. Increasingly, organizations are investing in labor-enhancing technology and tools — remote services delivery, knowledge management, collaboration, mobile solutions, professional services automation and quality control to wring the greatest productivity out of their work forces.

Many factors influence bill rates, but companies experiencing the highest growth also reported the highest rates. This correlation indicates that demand (and scarcity of qualified resources) significantly influences rates.

Increasing bill rates

Our research shows an increase in bill rates can have a dramatic positive impact on both profit and the employee work environment. Best-in-class professional services organizations tightly control pricing by carefully managing estimating, discounting and contract terms.

Leading services providers charge premium rates because they are recognized as specialists in their focused competency areas and have a demonstrated track record of producing excellent client results. The leading firms tend to pay more than average to ensure they hire only the best and brightest. They protect their rates by limiting discounting while providing employee incentives for achieving quality and profit targets.

Time after time, we have seen leading firms create a “circle of excellence” where their hiring practices contribute to building a quality work force that consistently delivers successful client outcomes. This leads to an excellent reputation, which supports a premium rate structure and ongoing investments in employee development.

Unfortunately, the exact opposite “circle of commoditization” is seen in “me too” services providers that compete on price. Bottom-feeders treat both their clients and their work force as commodities. Because they have a low rate structure, they cannot pay enough to attract or retain a premium work force, which means they must compete on price. Once a services provider becomes known as “the low-price leader,” its only successful strategy is to run a lean and mean organization with no frills and limited investment in employees or skill building.

Services providers should carefully review their market positioning and pricing to ensure they have not become “staffing providers” when they intended to be “solution providers” because the level of accountability for superior client outcomes directly influences pricing strategy.

The effect of bill rates on financial performance

Table 1 shows the impact on financial metrics as professional services organizations (PSOs) increase bill rates. Firms with average consulting bill rates of less than $150 per hour tend to be much smaller than organizations billing out at more than $200 per hour. The firms with higher bill rates can afford the luxury of more overhead and greater investments in employees and sales and marketing than those that bill less.

Table 1: The effect of bill rates

BillRateEffects

Source: Service Performance Insight, November 2010

The table shows organizations achieve significantly higher professional services contribution margins as bill rates increase, as well as significantly higher annual revenue per employee. Firms that sell services at higher bill rates control discounting and produce greater levels of profitability. Obviously, firms that charge more should make more. But firms can only attain higher bill rates by continually providing high-quality services that offer significant value to clients.

The cause and effect of higher bill rates

Bill rate combined with utilization is a leading indicator of the overall quality and differentiation of the organization. The fact that organizations with the highest bill rates tend to reinvest profit into their employees leads to a continuing improvement cycle.

Highly skilled, well-trained, motivated and loyal consultants undoubtedly produce the best results for clients. In turn, satisfied clients provide referrals and buy additional services resulting in improved sales effectiveness.

The correlation between high bill rates and employee investment that result in superior project delivery metrics and overall financial profit is one of the most dramatic findings from the early results of the 2010 PS Maturity Benchmark survey.